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  • 17Dec

    We recently posted 10 Medicare fact sheets translated into Chinese, Korean, Russian, and Spanish (Vietnamese translations are coming soon) on our website.

    These fact sheets help Medicare beneficiaries understand Medicare, and their rights and benefits.  Each fact sheet focuses on a specific Medicare topic.  Three of the 10 translated fact sheets are:

    • Medicare Part D: An Overview, which explains how the Medicare prescription drug program works and the costs;
    • Extra Help for Part D Costs, which describes the low income subsidy (LIS) program that helps some Medicare beneficiaries pay for their Medicare Part D plan; and
    • Medicare: An Overview, which summarizes the federal health care insurance program for people 65 years and older, younger people who have disabilities, and people who have kidney failure or end-stage renal disease.

     

    Medicare is complicated enough in English, and is even more complex for people who don’t speak or read English. We are thrilled to post these 10 translated fact sheets on CHA’s website so that more people – people who speak other languages – can learn about their Medicare benefits, options and rights.  This is just one step among many to help all California beneficiaries make informed decisions about their health care.

    Both the California Department of Aging (CDA) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) provided funding for the translations of these fact sheets. 

    For more information on providing services to people with limited English proficiency, see our article Speaking the Language: Are Your Services Available to Those Who Need Them?

    Posted by Karen Fletcher @ 12:02 pm

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